Installing Standing Seam Metal Roof

Metal roofs are great because they last a long time, are low maintenance, and hold up well in high winds.  There are many options when it comes to metal roofing.  You can get traditional corrugated metal roofing or standing seam metal roofing.  The difference is standing seam roofs don't have any exposed screws going through the metal - in other words, you don't have to worry so much about leaks down the road.  Standing seam roofs are a little more expense but not much considering the long-term advantages. This webpage will guide you through the steps of installing a standing seam metal roof.

Standing Seam Roof

standing seam roof    standing seam locking feature

Corrugated Metal Roof

corrugated metal roof  screws in metal roof

Corrugated metal roofing uses screws with rubber washers to seal the holes made through the metal but after 10-15 yrs of exposure to the elements and UV light, these often breakdown and then you you end up on your roof every year with a tube of silicon trying to seal up all the screws.  I've seen this on old farm houses where I grew up.

Cost of Standing Seam Metal Roof

We purchased our seamless roofing from Harrington and Company in Salt Lake who sells "Fabral" metaling roofing.  See Fabral.com for their complete product offerings.  There are tons of different colors and options available.  Some are energy star certified and allow you to get a tax credit of up to $1500 (30% of material costs).

The price of metal is constantly changing but when we purchased our metal roof it cost us $4,750 for all of the materials (metal sheets cut to length, drip edge, facia, soffit, pan-head screws, and delivery). 

A 26' standing seam sheet that covers 16" in width was $45.  This worked out to $1.32 per sq foot for the metal roofing.

Cost of installing standing seam metal roof:  $0  -  that's why you're reading this website:)

 

Standing Seam Metal Roofing Installation Guide

Estimating and Ordering

Sketch a birds-eye view of the roof and label each section (see example below)

ordering metal roof

Sketch a diagram of each roof section. Show all measurements (see example below).  It is important to measure the exact center of the ridge to the eave edge.  Do not allow anything for overhang.

measuring metal roof

With each roof section diagramed, you can determine length and number of panels needed.  A typical standing seam panel is 16" wide so you divide your total width by 1.33'(16") to get the number of sheets you need.  Hips and valleys in your roof must be accounted for.  Those angles can be cut on site but you need to make sure you have plenty of length.

New Roof Application

The next step to installing your standing seam metal roof is to prepare the roof surface.  Make sure there are no nails or other objects protruding from the substrate that might puncture the underlayment or damage the roof panels. Clean all debris from the deck.

Check all details for possible roof penetrations which must be added to the deck prior to roof panel installation (vented ridge for example).

Cover the entire roof deck with 30-pound felt paper, or Titanium Underlayment (hereinafter referred to as underlayment). Begin at the eave at the gable end and roll out the underlayment horizontally (parallel to the eave). Allow each consecutive course to overlap the previous one by 4-6”. Overlap the end a minimum of 6” when starting a new roll of underlayment. Areas of underlayment that have been torn or cut should be replaced or repaired prior to installation of the metal roof. (See Illustration below) Ice & Water shield
should be used in cold climates starting at the eave and extending at least 24” past exterior walls.

metal roof underlayment

Panel Installation

Note: Prior to standing seam panel installation, determine which items need to be installed prior to panels (such as vent screen, eave,
valley, swept wing, etc.)

1. Install eave trim (aka drip edge)
2. Working off the eave edge, establish a straight line up the gable edge from which you are starting. This will
insure that the first panel laid will be straight and square with the eave.
3. Before fastening the panel to the roof deck, hem 1” of the panel 180deg. (or allow a 1” overhang to attach an
angle piece to the eave).
4. Once the first panel is in proper position, secure it to the roof deck with the proper fasteners along the screw
flange (#10 x 1” Pancake woodscrew on 18” centers maximum.)
5. Install the gable trim and face screw it to fascia board. This fully secures the first panel to the
roof deck.
6. Position the second panel (overlap edge on top of the underlap edge of first panel) assuring that the eave
edge is in position (1” overhang). Secure the second panel to the first panel by applying slight pressure with
your foot on the overlap seam (or use rubber mallet) working from the eave toward the ridge. The overlap
edge of the panel contains factory-applied sealant to ensure weathertightness. Be sure that you
achieve a positive engagement between panels. Fasten the panel to the roof deck.
7. Each consecutive panel will be applied as in step #4 and #5 above.

    metal roof fasteners    gasketed fasteners

load table - steel panels

climaguard panel profile

 

Installation Details for Standing Seam Metal Roofing

start gable detail        finish gable detail

Vented Ridge 

You should install gable flashing prior to the ridge.  Plywood should be held back or cut back 1" from each side of the ridge if you are using a vented ridge setup.

endwall detail        sidewall detail

pipe flash metal roof

Pictures of our Cabin: Standing Seam Metal Roof Installation

cabin metal roof

steep metal roof

metal roof deliveried 

metal roof installing

evergreen metal roof

tin roof sidewall

wing gable

seamless metal roof

Hopefully that give you the basics for installing a standing seam metal roof.  I think it's easier than installing shingles but I'm sure others would argue differently. 

Back to Top - Installing Standing Seam Metal Roof

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